How can stem cells help treat or cure leukemia?

In leukemia, there is a population of cells, known as leukemia stem cells, that are resistant to treatment that works on other leukemia cells. Scientists are investigating the use of drugs that can specifically identify and then kill these leukemia stem cells. In essence, this type of therapy might not be classified as a stem […]

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How can stem cells help treat or cure age-related macular degeneration (AMD, or vision loss)?

Scientists are turning embryonic stem cells into the retinal cells that are malfunctioning and dying in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). These retinal cells can be implanted into the back of the eye to determine if this will help slow the vision loss caused by AMD.

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How can stem cells help treat or cure HIV/AIDS?

HIV/AIDS weakens the immune system. Stem cell approaches involve removing HIV+ patients’ blood-forming stem cells—which eventually become all the cells of the immune system—then modifying them to be resistant to or fight HIV. These blood-forming stem cells can then be transplanted back into the patient and hopefully reduce the risks associated with HIV.

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Kristin MacDonald with her nephew Chris

How can stem cells help treat or cure retinitis pigmentosa (blindness)?

Scientists are using stem cells to support and restore the light-sensing cells in the eye that degenerate and die in retinitis pigmentosa (RP). These fresh cells can be implanted into the back of the eye to see if this will help slow the vision loss caused by RP.

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How can stem cells help treat or cure cancer?

Scientists have recently discovered why solid tumor cancers often come back after treatment, and relapse occurs. Most tumors rely on a small population of cancer stem cells, which can be thought of as the “evil twins” of normal, “good” stem cells: rather than dividing to repair and heal tissue, they divide to form tumors. The […]

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How can stem cells help treat or cure Type 1 diabetes?

Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) develops when the body’s own immune system destroys the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. Since T1D patients cannot make their own insulin, they must take insulin multiple times daily to survive. In theory, embryonic stem cells can become any kind of cell type in the body, including cells that […]

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